415 N. Lee Street, Leesburg, FL 34748
(352) 787-5333

American Montessori Society Accredited School

Lake Montessori is the only Montessori school in Leesburg, Florida, using over 100 years of proven success to educate your children.

Dec
05
2017

Does teaching kids empathy prevent bullying?

“Peace is what every human being is craving for, and it can be brought about by humanity through the child.” –Dr. Maria Montessori

 

lmo bullyBy definition, Bullying is a willful, conscious desire to hurt, frighten, or threaten.  Although it is usually ongoing in nature, it may also consist of a single, intentional incident.  Bullying is a series of repeated, intentionally cruel incidents, or threat of harm, which involve the same children, in the same bully and victim roles.  It involves an imbalance of power, either real or perceived.  It can be physical andor verbal and may include racial, religious and sexual harassment.  Additionally, it can include offensive gestures, inappropriate touching, intimidation, extortion and social exclusion.  The behavior is designed to intentionally hurt, injure, embarrass, upset or discomfort the other person. Due to the willful and conscious nature, preschool children are not characteristically developmentally capable of carrying out bullying and are often involved in Normal Peer Conflicts.

Over the last decade, we have all been overwhelmed by the “bullying” epidemic in both private and schools. Tragedies, anti-bullying policies and legislation are at the forefront of news reports on a daily basis. Educators and parents have blamed the schools, media, parents, demographic factors, or even American culture itself.

School children in Montessori Academies see less bullying than those in more traditional quarters. In fact, some years pass along without an incident of any kind. Bullying is simply not part of our day here. Why not?

The traditional Montessori method and philosophy center around empathy, peace, and problem-solving; as well as respect for all people and materials. Integral to Montessori is a proactive approach:  preventing frustration, anger, and loss of self-control – elements that often incite or contribute to bullying. Montessori education provides children with the tools and a deep desire to empathize with each other and sort things out quickly amongst themselves - or with the gentle guidance of a teacher. Montessori children are encouraged to engage in discussions to resolve their differences, express their feelings,  and show empathy to others. It’s amazing, how quickly the children find solutions that work.

In the homogeneous setting of a traditional classroom, where all children are the same age and doing the same work, children often find a need to compare and separate themselves. Otherwise, what will make each child special? But in the heterogeneous Montessori setting, there is less need to compare oneself to another. Instead, children work for the love of work, and they aspire to the greater because, the older children are always present. Instead of separation, there is inherent unity, much like one would see in a large family of children all working for the common good of the whole.

Oct
24
2017

How to make sure you and your child are making slime the safe way.

make your own slime the safe wayAt home science, experiments can sometimes prove a bit risky for kids who aren’t aware of the safety precautions that need to be taken or those with sensitive skin. So, it’s important to know how to safely make homemade slime, so your fun science demonstration stays fun!

Typically, homemade slime is made by mixing old-fashioned Borax with liquid glue, water, and food coloring. However, following an unfortunate third-degree burn incident in Massachusetts, parents everywhere have questioned the safety of the recipe and seek out more kid-friendly ideas. While some doctors argue that there shouldn’t be enough Borax in the recipe to be absorbed through the skin, there are many stories of children with sensitive skin having issues with the ingredient.

The good news is that there are many ways to make homemade slime that omits the Borax in favor of more benign ingredients - perhaps even cornstarch. This way, even if your little one has sensitive skin, they don’t have to miss out on all the fun and science behind slime-making. Here is a simple, fun way to make kid-friendly slime - sans Borax (and no lab required!):

Dish Soap and Cornstarch

  1. Two tablespoons (15 grams) cornstarch
  2. 1½ tablespoons (22.5 milliliters) dish soap
  3. Food coloring (optional)
  4. Glitter (optional)
  5. Mixing bowl
  6. Spoon

Squeeze 1½ tablespoons (22.5 milliliters) of dish soap into a bowl. You can use more dish soap to make more slime, but you'll need to add more cornstarch as well.[1]

  • Consider using some colored or scented dish soap. For a more traditional slime, consider green dish soap.
  • You can also use shampoo instead of dish soap. The thicker the shampoo, the better!

Stir in some food coloring or glitter, if desired. You don't have to do this, but it will make your slime more interesting. If you used clear dish soap, add a drop of food coloring. If you want sparkly slime, addin a pinch of glitter. Stir everything together with a spoon.

Add two tablespoons (15 grams) of cornstarch into a mixing bowl. This will thicken the dish soap and turn it into slime![2]

  • If you used more dish soap, you would need to use more cornstarch.
  • If you can't find cornstarch, use cornflour instead.

Stir everything together for about 10 seconds. As you stir, the dish soap and cornstarch will come together and react to form slime!

Sep
21
2017

Teaching kids about internet bullying

internet bully

“Peace is what every human being is craving for, and it can be brought about by humanity through the child.” –Dr. Maria Montessori

By definition, Bullying is a willful, conscious desire to hurt, frighten, or threaten. Although it is usually ongoingnature, it may also consist of a single, intentional incident. Internet Bullying is a series of repeated, intentionally cruel incidents, or threat of harm, which involve the same children, in the same bully and victim roles. It involves an imbalance of power, either real or perceived. Internet bullying may include racial, religious and sexual harassment. Additionally, it can include offensive gestures, intimidation, extortion and social exclusion. The behavior is designed to intentionally hurt, injure, embarrass, upset or discomfort the other person. Due to the willful and conscious nature, preschool children are not characteristically developmentally capable of carrying out internet bullying and are often involved in Normal Peer Conflicts.

Over the last decade, we have all been overwhelmed by the “internet bullying” epidemic in both private and schools. Tragedies, anti-bullying policies, and legislation are at the forefront of news reports on a daily basis. Educators and parents have blamed the schools, media, parents, demographic factors, or even American culture itself.

School children in Montessori academies see less bullying than those in more traditional quarters. In fact, some years pass along without an incident of any kind. Bullying is simply not part of our day here. Why not?

The traditional Montessori method and philosophy center around empathy, peace, and problem-solving; as well as respect for all people and materials. Integral to Montessori is a proactive approach: preventing frustration, anger, and loss of self-control – elements that often incite or contribute to bullying. Montessori education provides children with the tools and a sincere desire to empathize with each other and sort things out quickly amongst themselves - or with the gentle guidance of a teacher. Montessori children are encouraged to engage in discussions to resolve their differences, express their feelings, and show empathy to others. It’s amazing, how quickly the children find solutions that work.

In the homogeneous setting of a traditional classroom, where all children are the same age and doing the same work, children often find a need to compare and separate themselves. Otherwise, what will make each child special? But in the heterogeneous Montessori setting, there is less need to compare oneself to another. Instead, children work for the love of work, and they aspire to the greater because, the older children are always present. Instead of separation, there is inherent unity, much like one would see in a large family of children all working for the common good of the whole.

Jul
14
2017

Elementary School Supply List 2017-2018

Here is the elementary school supply list for the 2017-2018 school year.

Elementary School Supply List 2017-2018

  • 3 large/jumbo disinfecting wipes (i.e.: Clorox, Lysol, etc.)
  • 2 cans of Lysol disinfectant spray
  • 1 box gallon zip lock bags
  • 12 composition books (1st-3rd grade Wide Ruled, 4th-7th grade College Ruled, no animation/picture on cover)
  • 2 grid composition books
  • 2 boxes of colored pencils
  • 3 boxes Ticonderoga #2 pencils
  • 1 pack: 2 count large erasers
  • 3 glue sticks
  • 1 pack of sheet protectors
  • 1 pack of Sticky flags (Post-Its)
  • 1 3-inch white three ring binder
  • 1 ream of white card stock
  • 2 plastic pocket folders with brads
  • 3 packs of self-drying multi-colored clay
  • 3- 8”×10” white canvases (stretched canvas frame)
Jul
14
2017

Primary School Supply List 2017-2018

Here is the primary school supply list for the 2017-2018 school year.

Primary School Supply List 2017-2018

  • 3 large/jumbo disinfecting wipes (i.e.: Clorox, Lysol, etc.)
  • 2 cans of Lysol disinfectant spray
  • 3 packs baby wipes (refillable kind is fine)
  • 1 box gallon zip lock bags
  • 6 glue sticks
  • 2 bottles of white glue
  • 2 boxes of colored pencils: 24 count (not Crayola)
  • 1 box washable markers
  • 2 boxes Ticonderoga #2 pencils
  • 1 pack: 2 count large erasers
  • 1 ream white card-stock
  • 3 composition notebooks (no animation/picture on cover)
  • A complete change of clothes to keep in the classroom. Please included undergarments and socks. Place these in a zip lock bag, labeled with your child’s name.

Important Dates

  • December 21, 2017
    Winter Break
  • January 15, 2018
    MLK Jr Birthday (Student Holiday)
  • February 19, 2018
    Presidents Day (Student Holiday)
  • March 19, 2018
    Spring Break

Famous Montessori Students

Former Washington Post Editor Katharine Graham

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

Author Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Singer/Songwriter Taylor Swift

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales

Musician Yo Yo Ma

Actress Dakota Fanning

Former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

Chef Julia Child

Helen Keller

Musician Sean "Diddy" Combs

Queen Noor of Jordan

Magician David Blaine

Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin

Video Game Creator Will Wright

Singer/Songwriter Beyonce Knowles

Actor George Clooney

Anne Frank